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Catching Up with Mizzou’s Snap Counts at the Halfway Mark

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Running back, defensive end and safety are pretty egalitarian. Quarterback, offensive line and linebacker...not so much.

Snap Counts

Now that the season is halfway through, I thought it would be a good time to consolidate all of the Tigers’ snap count data from the season and present it in a way that’s (hopefully) digestible and able to reinforce/challenge notions of who’s playing too much, who’s not playing enough, what’s working, what’s not, etc.

Only plays that officially counted are counted — so, no penalties — and special teams trick plays/botched snaps are not counted either. In the offensive and defensive set numbers at the bottom, kneels are also excluded. Because, come on.

The values in the parentheses next to the players’ snap numbers are his snaps per game played and the percent of the team’s total offensive or defensive plays in which he has been active this year, minus the snaps we discussed above (penalties and special teams shenanigans).


Quarterback

Drew Lock454 (75.7; 93.2%)
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Taylor Powell28 (14.0; 5.75%)
Micah Wilson — 5 (5.0; 1.03%)

Running Back

Larry Rountree — 183 (30.5; 37.6%)
—————
Tyler Badie150 (25.0; 30.8%)
Damarea Keener-Crockett — 146 (24.3; 30.0%)
Dawson Downing14 (7.0; 2.87%)

Rountree has logged a carry on 46.4 percent of his snaps, Crockett on 52.7 percent of his and Badie on 37.3 percent of his. Badie (3.33%) and Crockett (2.74%) have also lined up wide more often than Rountree (1.64%), and Badie has been targeted for a pass on 9.33% of his snaps, far more often than Crockett (4.79%) and Rountree (3.83%).

Receiver

Johnathon Johnson279 (46.5; 57.3%)
Nate Brown254 (63.5; 52.2%)
Jalen Knox226 (37.7; 46.4%)
—————
Emanuel Hall204 (51.0; 41.9%)
Kam Scott174 (29.0; 35.7%)
Dominic Gicinto52 (10.4; 10.7%)
Alex Ofodile45 (9.0; 9.24%)
Khmari Thompson14 (7.0; 2.87%)
Barrett Banister13 (4.3; 2.67%)

In games in which they’ve actually played, Brown (73.6%) and Hall (59.1%) have actually played a larger proportion of games than Johnson. But they’ve also both only played four games. It’s pretty interesting that Lock targets Hall and Knox (13.5% of snaps) far more frequently than he targets Brown and Scott (6.54%), but he targets Johnson and Gicinto (14.5%) in the slot more often on a per-snap basis, even though the slot is only filled by an actual wideout about 68 percent of the time.

Tight End

Albert Okwuegbunam339 (56.5; 69.6%)
—————
Kendall Blanton277 (46.2; 56.9%)
Daniel Parker27 (5.4; 5.54%)
Logan Christopherson19 (19.0; 3.90%)
Brendan Scales13 (6.5; 2.67%)

Missouri’s tight ends per snap (TEPS) rate is hovering right around 1.39 for the season. Solid. You’ll notice, also, that the Tigers’ backup tight end (Blanton) is playing just about as often as their third-most used wideout (Johnson...on a snaps per game actually played basis), which is a huge change from last year, when Blanton (339) played only about 63 percent as often as Johnson (541). Keeping an eye on how Okwuegbunam and Blanton are used differently, Okwuegbunam has an 18/40/42 percent split between lining up in the backfield/on the line/out wide, and Blanton’s split is 12/28/60. So: Blanton is attached a lot more, and Okwuegbunam is split wide.

Line

Paul Adams460 (76.7; 94.5%)
Tre’Vour Wallace-Simms — 448 (74.7; 92.0%)
Trystan Colon-Castillo432 (72.0; 88.7%)
Yasir Durant408 (68.0; 83.8%)
Kevin Pendleton302 (60.4; 62.0%)
—————
Case Cook144 (28.8; 29.6%)
Hyrin White79 (19.8; 16.2%)
Samson Bailey63 (15.8; 12.9%)
Jonah Dubinski43 (14.3; 8.83%)
Larry Borom27 (13.5; 5.54%)
Mike Ruth22 (22.0; 4.52%)
Xavier Delgado12 (12.0; 2.46%)

Pendleton has played about 74.2 percent of the snaps in the games in which he has been available, after missing the opener against UT Martin. Adams is your offensive Ironman right now, edging out Lock by six snaps.


End

Chris Turner252 (42.0; 62.1%)
Tre Williams225 (37.5; 55.4%)
—————
Nate Anderson187 (31.2; 46.1%)
Akial Byers76 (12.7; 18.7%)
Trajan Jeffcoat39 (9.8; 9.61%)
Franklin Agbasimere28 (7.0; 6.90%)
Jatorian Hansford — 16 (5.3; 3.94%)
Myles Eaddy3 (3.0; 0.74%)

Anderson was averaging 35.2 snaps a game before a lingering injury from South Carolina limited him to 11 snaps against Alabama, so it really has been a pretty equitable 1a/1b/1c situation with he, Turner and Williams throughout the year. Anderson has also been the most versatile option of the three, taking 9.63% of his snaps at tackle and 13.9% as standing rush end. Byers is the most upwardly mobile one, starting the season third string on the tackle depth before he and Jeffcoat lapped Agbasimere at end.

Tackle

Terry Beckner — 254 (42.3; 62.6%)
Walter Palmore — 177 (29.5; 43.6%)
—————
Jordan Elliott162 (27.0; 39.9%)
Kobie Whiteside104 (17.3; 25.6%)
Rashad Brandon35 (11.7; 8.62%)
Tyrell Jacobs13 (6.5; 3.20%)
Antar Thompson11 (5.5; 2.71%)
Markell Utsey7 (7.0; 1.72%)

Palmore and Elliott have been pretty interchangeable alongside Beckner, with Elliott holding an edge in production on a per-snap basis: 13.5 snaps per tackle compared to Palmore’s 16.9; 46.3 snaps per tackle for loss to Palmore’s 88.5. Whiteside has been a pretty consistent fourth option, but he’s being pushed a bit by Brandon now that the senior is healthy: Whiteside actually only holds a 39-35 snap edge over Brandon in the three games in which Brandon has played this year.

Linebacker

Cale Garrett351 (58.5; 86.5%)
Terez Hall318 (53.0; 78.3%)
Brandon Lee271 (45.2; 66.7%)
—————
Ronnell Perkins96 (19.2; 23.6%)
Nick Bolton63 (21.0; 15.5%)
Jamal Brooks18 (9.0; 4.43%)
Aubrey Miller — 10 (10.0; 2.46%)
Jacob Trump10 (5.0; 2.46%)
Tavon Ross5 (2.5; 1.23%)

If you take out the 49 snaps of the Alabama game that Hall missed for targeting, he’s actually up more around 89 percent of the defense’s total snaps this year. As it stands, though, Garrett is your defensive Ironman. The Hall-Garrett-Lee triumvirate has had a pretty steadfast stranglehold over the linebacker snaps ever since Barry Odom and Ryan Walters made the switch over from Kaleb Prewett in the Nickel midway through last season, but it’s interesting to see Perkins and Bolton getting looks interspersed. Because Missouri’s going to need them next year.

Cornerback

Adam Sparks335 (55.8; 82.5%)
DeMarkus Acy286 (47.7; 70.4%)
—————
Christian Holmes181 (30.2; 44.6%)
Terry Petry70 (14.0; 17.2%)
Jarvis Ware36 (12.0; 8.87%)

Acy missed 70 snaps of the Purdue game by knocking himself out, so his played percentage is more accurately in the 85-percent range, right up around Sparks. Sparks has actually been the Tigers’ most-used nickelback this season, taking 18 percent of his snaps there. Petry, too, has been an extra corner in the Dime fairly often, taking his 52.9 percent of his snaps in that set.

Safety

Khalil Oliver254 (42.3; 62.6%)
Cam Hilton248 (41.3; 61.1%)
—————
Joshuah Bledsoe — 205 (41.0; 50.5%)
Tyree Gillespie105 (17.5; 25.9%)
Jordan Ulmer14 (7.0; 3.45%)

As you can see, when you take out the Wyoming game that Bledsoe missed, he’s actually got a 1c situation going on with Oliver and Hilton. And, to make matters even more confusing, he (91) and Gillespie (75) have been repping right about even with Oliver (74) and Hilton (92) over the past two games. Gillespie, too, takes about 14.5 percent of his snaps at nickelback in the Dime.


Experience Breakdown

Team
Senior — 35.7%
Sophomore — 27.4%
Junior — 24.6%
Freshman — 12.3% (True: 8.46%; Redshirt: 3.87%)

Offense
Senior — 37.6%
Junior — 25.6%
Freshman — 18.4% (True: 12.6%; Redshirt: 5.79%)
Sophomore — 18.4%

Defense
Sophomore — 38.1%
Senior — 33.5%
Junior — 23.4%
Freshman — 5.02% (True: 3.45%; Redshirt: 1.57%)

Missouri is getting about 60.3% of its overall snaps from juniors and seniors, which is the exact same level from 2017 and 2015, ahead of 2016 (56.3) and well behind 2014 (70.7) and 2013 (69.3). It’s pretty striking that sophomores are outrepping juniors overall and outrepping seniors and juniors on the defense. This offense, by upperclassmen snap percent (63.2) is the Tigers’ most experienced since 2014 (78.5). The defense (56.9) is its least experienced in the five years I’ve been charting snaps, coming closest to 2014 (63.3). Barring defections, though, that 61.5 percent from sophomores and juniors will be upperclassmen next season. So maybe that bodes well for 2019’s defense?


Top 5 Offensive Sets

3-WR/1-TE/1-RB (Usage: 31.1%)
Run: 78 for 385 (4.94 avg.), TD
Pass: 39-of-71, 468 yards (6.59 avg.), 3 TD, 2 INT, 2 fumbles lost
Sack: 1 for -18, fumble lost
Total: 150 for 835 (5.57 avg.), 4 TD, 5 TO

4-WR/1-RB (Usage: 28.8%)
Run: 32 for 182 (5.69 avg.), 2 TD
Pass: 61-of-102, 696 yards (6.82 avg.), 3 TD, 4 INT
Sack: 5 for -31, fumble lost
Total: 139 for 847 (6.09 avg.), 5 TD, 5 TO

3-WR/2-RB (Usage: 14.7%)
Run: 42 for 256 (6.10 avg.), TD
Pass: 18-of-28, 180 yards (6.43 avg.), 3 TD
Sack: 1 for -6
Total: 71 for 430 (6.06 avg.), 4 TD

2-WR/2-TE/1-RB (Usage: 13.9%)
Run: 53 for 216 (4.08 avg.), 3 TD
Pass: 9-of-14, 229 yards (16.4 avg.), 2 TD
Total: 67 for 445 (6.64 avg.), 5 TD

2-WR/1-TE/2-RB (Usage: 5.39%)
Run: 22 for 82 (3.73 avg.)
Pass: 2-of-4, 14 yards (3.50 avg.)
Total: 26 for 96 (3.69 avg.)

Derek Dooley has used 12 different personnel formations when it comes to skill position players this year. I’ve decided to spare you and only highlight the five most used.

The two main ones — 3-1-1 and 4-0-1 — take up about 60 percent of the Tigers’ total plays and average 5.82 yards a play, but also turn the ball over (10 times) more often than they yield scores (nine times). The 3-1-1 is a pretty even run-pass set (52.0/48.0 play distribution), while the 4-0-1 is heavy pass (23.0/77.0), the 3-0-2 (59.2/40.8) is heavier run, and the 2-2-1 (79.1/20.9) and 2-1-2 (84.6/15.4) are both very heavy run. Notice, though, that Missouri has experienced pretty amazing success when it does decide to throw out of the 2-2-1: 9-of-14 for 229 yards and two scores.

Teams seem to have caught on, though: the Tigers are 0-for-3 passing from that set against SEC competition.

—————

Top 4 Defensive Sets

4-3 (Usage: 68.2%)
Run: 161 for 617 (3.83 avg.), 4 TD, fumble lost
Pass: 75-of-111, 1190 yards (10.7 avg.), 10 TD, 1 INT, fumble lost
Sack: 5 for -29, fumble lost
Total: 277 for 1778 (6.42 avg.), 14 TD, 4 TO

3-4 (Usage: 15.8%)
Rush: 28 for 108 (3.86 avg.)
Pass: 20-of-36, 266 yards (7.39 avg.), 2 TD
Total: 64 for 374 (5.84 avg.), 2 TD

3-2-6 Dime (Usage: 8.62%)
Run: 4 for 21 (5.25 avg.)
Pass: 15-of-30, 202 yards (6.73 avg.), TD, INT
Sack: 1 for -6
Total: 35 for 217 (6.20 avg.), TD, TO

4-1-6 Dime (Usage: 6.16%)
Run: 3 for 19 (6.33 avg.)
Pass: 10-of-21, 138 yards (6.57 avg.)
Sack: 1 for -11
Total: 25 for 146 (5.84 avg.)

Likewise, Walters has used eight different looks on defense — including one in which only 10 guys were on the field...whoops... — this season, but these top four take up 98.8 percent of the total snaps.

The base defense 4-3 is good against the run but god awful against the pass, giving up a 185.55 opponent passer rating. Missouri has trotted out its Dime about 14.8 percent of the time overall in third-down/end of game or half situations, with the 3-front Dime outrepping the 4-front Dime by 1.46 percent. A lot of that was on South Carolina’s game-winning drive, in which the Tigers went with an all-tackle three-front on all but one play. It didn’t really work, and we didn’t see it against Alabama. All in all, though, the Dime has been a fairly decent specialty set, giving up only 49 percent completions and allowing 6.05 yards a play, which is better than the base 4-3/3-4 (6.31).