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Missouri-Kentucky snap counts: Tigers’ Run Game Can’t Stretch Wildcats’ Defense

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Missouri tried to get outside the tackles to fertile ground against Kentucky. It just didn’t work all that well.

Snap Counts

If you followed along with my work in this space last year, you know that I endeavored to provide snap counts for every Missouri player for every offensive and defensive snap that counted during the season.

If you were not...well, I just explained what this is in the last graf. You should have paid attention.

Anyway, I pored over the film of the Tigers’ backbreaking 15-14 loss to Kentucky to see who Missouri used on offense and defense, how often and in what ways. Then I tried to gather it in a way that wouldn’t bore you too terribly.

Did I fail? Did I succeed? I suppose that’s up for history to decide.

On we go with Year 3 of ... Snap Counts...


Observations

  • I’m highlighting the teams’ relative successes running through certain gaps for a couple of reasons which will soon become clear. First, Kentucky.
  • What do I always say? Teams can’t run between the tackles against Missouri and expect to have success. They just can’t. I understand that’s Kentucky’s thing and everything, but the Wildcats tried between the tackles 15 times for only 38 yards against Missouri. That’s 2.53 per. Compare that to 15 for 58 yards, or 3.87 per, outside the tackles. That’s a 53-percent increase per rush.
  • Don't. Run. Between. The. Tackles. Against. Missouri. I don’t know what’s so difficult to understand about this. The Tigers’ best three defenders (Terry Beckner, Terez Hall and Cale Garrett) ARE RIGHT FREAKING THERE. Don’t run at them. Yeesh.
  • Rant over.
  • OK, now to Missouri. Check out the difference when it tried to run outside and inside the tackles: inside — 12 for 41 yards, 3.42 avg; outside — 20 for 67, 3.35 avg. See the difference? No? Good, because there isn’t one. That’s a testament to the vertical speed of Kentucky’s defense, which was able to track Missouri’s backs wide and limit cutback lanes.
  • And by “Kentucky’s defense,” I mean Josh Allen. That dude is ridiculous.
  • Damarea Keener-Crockett (24) and Larry Rountree (23) split the running back carries about evenly, with Tyler Badie (15...one split wide) taking the rest.
  • Cameron Wilkins gets the Mr. Versatility award this week. The true freshman linebacker, who had only seen special teams action thus far this season, played three snaps on offense against Kentucky: one at fullback, one at H-back and one attached as a tight end.
  • And Missouri scored on two of those three plays: a 66.7 percent success rate. Not bad at all.
  • With Kendall Blanton out and Daniel Parker...missing?...for some reason?...after sitting out the first half for his targeting suspension?...Albert Okwuegbunam played every. Single. Snap. That’s impressive.
  • Half of those 62 snaps came attached on the line, and he split the other half pretty evenly between H-back (16) and split wide (15).
  • Samson Bailey also got an extended look in that No. 91 jersey, lining up at tight end 20 times, H-back three times and even wide receiver once. Brendan Scales also got five snaps. He caught a pass right out of halftime and was never heard from again. Again, not really sure why.
  • Richaud Floyd (28) again got the bulk of the snaps at the outside slot opposite Jalen Knox (52), with Nate Brown logging 11 in his return to match Kam Scott. Johnathon Johnson saw 42 snaps as well.
  • Not really sure what’s going on with Nate Anderson, but he only got one snap at end. That left more for Tre Williams (50), Akial Byers (44) and Chris Turner (38). Franklin Agbasimere appears to have pulled himself at least back even with Trajan Jeffcoat picking up the rest of the second-string snaps at end.
  • Brandon Lee also sneaks into the end depth for one snap on that stuffed goal-line run. He put his hand in the dirt and moved Turner inside on a 6-front look.
  • Speaking of strange fronts, Missouri had a thing for when Kentucky went into the Wildcat. The Tigers stood their ends up, brought Ronnell Perkins in for Lee and crept Hall up to the line. It worked for two plays but, on the one where Terry Wilson motioned back into the backfield out of a Wildcat look, it did hemorrhage that 43-yard pass to Lynn Bowden.
  • Same old, same old at tackle. Beckner (42) is the leader of the pack, Walter Palmore (32) and Jordan Elliott (26) are 1b/1c, and Rashad Brandon (20) and Kobie Whiteside (15) are the rest of the depth.
  • Despite coming off the bench, Adam Sparks (57) ended up out-repping Christian Holmes (31) quite comfortably, with a 42-31 edge at corner. DeMarkus Acy did not leave the field. And, as his reward, he got called for an extremely questionable pass interference that extended the game so Kentucky could win.
  • Poor DeMarkus.
  • Khalil Oliver appears to be the forgotten man at safety. Tyree Gillespie (50) and Cam Hilton (47) significantly out-repped him (24) and, even thought Joshuah Bledsoe only saw 27 snaps at the back, he did also get 19 snaps at nickelback in the Tigers’ Nickel and Dime sets.
  • Speaking of the Nickel, it came back! It had only been used for, like, one snap all year, but Missouri trotted it out four times against Kentucky — three 3rd-and-4s that all resulted in stops and that strange 2nd-and-17 on the last drive in which all five defensive backs stood, like, 20 yards off the line of scrimmage...and everyone else pass-rushed...and Kentucky got 17 yards and out of bounds.
  • Very strange call. Did not work in the least.
  • The Tigers also mostly camped out in their 3-2-6 Dime against Kentucky, with the 4-1-6 getting only one play. They probably wanted Garrett’s insane tackling prowess on the field as much as possible and didn’t want to give him up in the 4-1-6. A good instinct, that.
  • The 3-2-6 actually did very well...until the last drive. For the game, the set gave up 99 yards on 14 plays. On that drive, it gave up 54 yards on six plays, and that’s counting two sacks.
  • The offense was basically a mess all over. Credit Derek Dooley, though, for trotting out TEN different personnel groupings against Kentucky...I guess. They were the (deeeeeep breath): 5-0-0, 4-0-1, 3-1-1, 3-0-2, 2-2-1, 2-1-2, 1-2-1, 1-2-2, 0-3-2 and 0-2-3.
  • The 3-wide/tight end/running back look got the most use, netting 82 yards on 18 plays. The 4-0-1 was the most effective, with 65 yards on 11. The 2-1-2 was least, with only 28 yards on 12 plays.
  • Dooley used it a lot when he tried to get conservative and ice the game in the second half. Didn’t really work. The Tigers’ really seemed to miss Blanton in those moments.

Kentucky When Running...

Off Left Tackle: 7 for 18 (2.57 avg.)
Between LT and Left Guard: 2 for 1 (0.50 avg.)
Between LG and Center: 3 for 11 (3.67 avg.)
To the Left Side: 12 for 30 (2.50 avg.)

Between C and Right Guard: 2 for 1 (0.50 avg.)
Between RG and Right Tackle: 8 for 25 (3.13 avg.)
Off RT: 8 for 40 (5.00 avg.)
To the Right Side: 18 for 66 (3.67 avg.)

Between the Tackles: 15 for 38 (2.53 avg.)
Outside the Tackles: 15 for 58 (3.87 avg.)
Scrambles: 2 for 11 (5.50 avg.)

—————

Missouri When Running...

Off Left Tackle: 10 for 25 (2.50 avg.)
Between LT and Left Guard: 7 for 31 (4.43 avg.), TD
Between LG and Center: 3 for 8 (2.67 avg.)
To the Left Side: 20 for 64 (3.20 avg.), TD

Between RG and Right Tackle: 2 for 2 (1.00 avg.)
Off RT: 10 for 42 (4.20 avg.), TD
To the Right Side: 12 for 44 (3.67 avg.), TD

Between the Tackles: 12 for 41 (3.42 avg.), TD
Outside the Tackles: 20 for 67 (3.35 avg.), TD
Jet Sweep: 1 for -7


Offense

Quarterback
Drew Lock — 62

Running Back
Damarea Keener-Crockett — 24
Larry Rountree — 23
Tyler Badie — 14
Cameron Wilkins — 1

H-Back
Albert Okwuegbunam — 16
Samson Bailey — 3
Brendan Scales — 3
Richaud Floyd — 1
Cameron Wilkins — 1

Wide Receiver
Jalen Knox — 52
Johnathon Johnson — 42
Richaud Floyd — 27
Albert Okwuegbunam — 15
Nate Brown — 11
Kam Scott — 11
Alex Ofodile — 7
Barrett Banister — 2
Tyler Badie — 1
Samson Bailey — 1
Dominic Gicinto — 1

Tight End
Albert Okwuegbunam — 31
Samson Bailey — 20
Brendan Scales — 2
Cameron Wilkins — 1

Line
Paul Adams — 62
Trystan Colon-Castillo — 62
Yasir Durant — 62
Kevin Pendleton — 62
Tre’Vour Wallace-Simms — 62

—————

Defense

End
Tre Williams — 47
Akial Byers — 41
Chris Turner — 36
Franklin Agbasimere — 8
Trajan Jeffcoat — 5
Nate Anderson — 1
Brandon Lee — 1

Tackle
Terry Beckner — 42
Walter Palmore — 32
Jordan Elliott — 26
Rashad Brandon — 20
Kobie Whiteside — 15
Chris Turner — 1

Rush End
Akial Byers — 3
Tre Williams — 3
Franklin Agbasimere — 1
Trajan Jeffcoat — 1
Chris Turner — 1

Linebacker
Terez Hall — 74
Cale Garrett — 73
Brandon Lee — 51
Ronnell Perkins — 3

Nickelback
Joshuah Bledsoe — 19
Adam Sparks — 15

Cornerback
DeMarkus Acy — 74
Adam Sparks — 42
Christian Holmes — 31

Safety
Tyree Gillespie — 50
Cam Hilton — 47
Joshuah Bledsoe — 27
Khalil Oliver — 24


Offensive Set Success

3-WR/1-TE/1-RB
Run: 9 for 36 (4.00 avg.)
Pass: 5-of-7, 63 yards (9.00 avg.)
Sack: 2 for -17
Total: 18 plays, 82 yards (4.56 avg.)

2-WR/1-TE/2-RB
Run: 8 for 27 (3.38 avg.)
Pass: 1-of-4, 1 yard (0.25 avg.)
Total: 12 plays, 28 yards (2.33 avg.)

4-WR/1-RB
Run: 1 for 1
Pass: 7-of-10, 64 yards (6.40 avg.)
Total: 11 plays, 65 yards (5.91 avg.)

3-WR/2-RB
Run: 5 for 8 (1.60 avg.)
Pass: 1-of-4, 32 yards (8.00 avg.)
Total: 9 plays, 40 yards (4.44 avg.)

2-WR/2-TE/1-RB
Run: 6 for 21 (3.50 avg.)
Pass: 0-of-1
Total: 7 plays, 21 yards (3.00 avg.)

5-WR
Pass: 1-of-1, 5 yards

1-WR/2-TE/2-RB
Run: 1 for 4

1-WR/3-TE/1-RB
Run: 1 for 1

2-TE/3-RB
Run: 1 for 2, TD

3-TE/2-RB
Run: 1 for 1, TD

—————

Defensive Set Success

4-3
Run: 22 for 90 (4.09 avg.)
Pass: 16-of-25, 124 yards (4.96 avg.), TD, INT
Sack: 1 for -2
Total: 48 plays, 212 yards (4.42 avg.), TD, INT

Dime (3-2-6)
Run: 3 for 3 (1.00 avg.)
Pass: 6-of-9, 110 yards (12.2 avg.)
Sack: 2 for -14
Total: 14 plays, 99 yards (7.07 avg.)

Nickel
Run: 1 for 2
Pass: 1-of-3, 17 yards (5.67 avg.)
Total: 4 plays, 19 yards (4.75 avg.)

3-4
Run: 2 for 8 (4.00 avg.)
Pass: 1-of-1, 4 yards
Total: 3 plays, 12 yards (4.00 avg.)

2-front
Run: 2 for 2 (1.00 avg.)
Pass: 1-of-1, 43 yards
Total: 3 plays, 45 yards (15.0 avg.)

6-front
Run: 1 for 0

Dime (4-1-6)
Run: 1 for 2