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Mississippi State's offense is run by the ultimate high-usage quarterback

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Believe it or not, Missouri has an opponent this Thursday! We've spent quite a bit of time talking about the Tigers' quarterback situation, but it's two days to kickoff. Let's talk Mississippi State.

Matt Bush-USA TODAY Sports

Offense

QB
Dak Prescott (6'2, 230, Sr.) -- 173-for-260 (67%), 2,048 yards, 14 TD, 1 INT, 10 sacks (7.3 yards/att.); 62 carries, 440 yards (7.1), 7 TD
Nick FItzgerald (6'5, 227, RSFr.) -- 10-for-11 (91%), 231 yards, 3 TD, 0 INT, 0 sacks (21.0 yards/att.); 18 carries, 103 yards (5.7), 3 TD
Elijah Staley (6'6, 248, RSFr.) -- 3-for-5 (60%), 51 yards, 1 TD, 0 INT, 0 sacks (10.2 yards/att.); 3 carries, 18 yards (6.0)

If Dak Prescott were a basketball player, he'd be a Russell Westbrook type -- if his team is scoring points, he either took the shot or assisted the shooter. He is the definition of a high-usage quarterback: 34 pass attempts and eight rushes per game.

He's also good. Maybe not Russell Westbrook good, but in a league admittedly bereft of high-caliber QBs, he's pretty easily the most proven.

He's also barely making any mistakes. He was a pretty volatile player in previous years, but he's thrown just one pick all season and fumbled once, and he's taken sacks on fewer than four percent of his passes -- a brilliant average for a dual-threat guy.

Prescott can still be slowed down a bit. He was only 20-for-34 for 210 yards against A&M (passer rating: 110.7), and MSU has been held under 20 points three times, twice by defenses quite a bit worse than Missouri's (Auburn, A&M). But he and the Bulldogs come to Columbia smoking hot, having averaged 7.1 yards per play and 44 points per game in their last three contests.

Missouri has the best defense the Bulldogs have faced since Week 2 (LSU), but Prescott is also the best QB Mizzou has seen this year. Really curious about how Barry Odom chooses to attack Prescott ... and how successful he is at it.

RB
Ashton Shumpert (6'2, 218, Jr.) -- 42 carries, 159 yards (3.8), 1 TD; 16 targets, 10 catches, 87 yards (5.4)
Brandon Holloway (5'8, 165, Jr.) -- 43 carries, 196 yards (4.6); 20 targets, 14 catches, 153 yards (7.7), 2 TD
Dontavian Lee (6'1, 227, RSFr.) -- 21 carries, 135 yards (6.4); 2 targets, 2 catches, 15 yards (7.5)
Aeris Williams (6'1, 205, RSFr.) -- 29 carries, 118 yards (4.1), 2 TD; 4 targets, 3 catches, 14 yards (3.5)

Prescott is also probably MSU's best running back. The Bulldogs' by-committee approach has been decent -- 22 intended touches (carries plus targets) per game, five yards a pop -- but they rank just 65th in Rushing S&P+. Step 1 to beating them is rendering them one-dimensional, making Prescott carry an even heavier load, and Mizzou could be equipped to do that.

WR
De'Runnya Wilson (6'5, 215, Jr.) -- 53 targets, 33 catches, 524 yards (9.9), 6 TD
Joe Morrow (6'4, 202, Sr.) -- 8 targets, 4 catches, 79 yards (9.9), 1 TD

WR
Fred Brown (6'1, 196, Jr.) -- 27 targets, 18 catches, 285 yards (10.6), 1 TD
Donald Gray (5'10, 193, So.) -- 18 targets, 13 catches, 264 yards (14.7), 2 TD

WR
Fred Ross (6'2, 207, Jr.) - 56 targets, 40 catches, 433 yards (7.7)
Gabe Myles (6'0, 192, So.) -- 7 targets, 5 targets, 101 yards (14.4), 2 TD; 5 carries, 19 yards (3.8), 1 TD
Malik Dear (5'9, 220, Fr.) -- 23 targets, 17 catches, 169 yards (7.4); 8 carries, 80 yards (10.0), 1 TD

TE
Gus Walley (6'4, 242, Jr.) -- 19 targets, 15 catches, 109 yards (5.7)
Darrion Hutcherson (6'7, 260, Sr.) -- 9 targets, 8 catches, 90 yards (10.0)
Justin Johnson (6'3, 229, Fr.) -- 7 targets, 5 catches, 41 yards (5.9)

Making MSU one-dimensional doesn't automatically equate to stopping this offense, though. The passing game is devastatingly efficient. There are some big-play threats here -- De'Runnya Wilson might be the most underrated receiver in the country, and Fred Brown and Donald Gray have both produced some big plays -- but MSU's biggest assets are diversity and consistency.

Prescott has targeted eight guys at least 16 times each (and only two more than 27 times), and all eight guys have catch rates of at least 62 percent. (By contrast, Mizzou's top four targets have combined for a 47 percent catch rate.)

LT
Rufus Warren (6'7, 299, Sr.) -- 7 career starts
Elgton Jenkins (6'4, 304, RSFr.) -- 1 career start

LG
Justin Malone (6'7, 320, Sr.) -- 24 career starts (18 at LG)
Deion Calhoun (6'3, 303, RSFr.)

C
Jamaal Clayborn (6'4, 315, Jr.) -- 8 career starts
Jocquell Johnson (6'4, 300, Jr.)

RG
Devon Desper (6'4, 305, Jr.) -- 10 career starts
Damien Robinson (6'8, 325, Sr.)

RT
Justin Senior (6'5, 295, Jr.) -- 23 career starts (22 at RT)
Cole Carter (6'6, 299, Jr.)

Because of the quicker nature of the passing game, MSU's sack rates are pretty solid this year. And because of the, uh, girth of the offensive line (and the fact that Prescott is enormous), the Bulldogs are good in short yardage, too. But while MSU's line is good, it's not spectacular. Mizzou should be able to hold its own and make a few plays.

Assuming Missouri's defense maintains its October form, I would be surprised if MSU scores too many points. The trick, of course, is that Mizzou's offense still has to match whatever MSU produces. You probably don't need me to tell you that could be an issue.